Flint, Michigan water supply issues

Home Forums Current Events Flint, Michigan water supply issues

This topic contains 1 reply, has 1 voice, and was last updated by Profile photo of Mark Mark 9 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #525 Score: 0
    Profile photo of Mark
    Mark
    Keymaster
    1 pt

    Post your Flint water supply source links here. One link per post, please.

    It seems many people believe that what’s going on in Flint is the result of capitalism. Unfortunately, there seems to be little to no evidence to support the accusation. Instead, what we find is government mismanagement from the city all the way to the federal level and every stage in between.

    #526 Score: 0
    Profile photo of Mark
    Mark
    Keymaster
    1 pt

    Flint Water Crisis Fast Facts
    http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/04/us/flint-water-crisis-fast-facts/

    Highlights from the link:

    In 2011, the state of Michigan took over Flint’s finances after an audit projected a $25 million deficit. Even though Flint’s water supply fund was $9 million in the red, officials were using some of this money to cover shortfalls in its general fund.

    January 12, 2015 – The DWSD offers to reconnect the city with Lake Huron water, waiving a $4 million fee to restore service. City officials decline, citing concerns water rates could go up more than $12 million each year, even with the reconnection fee waiver.

    February 26, 2015 – The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) notifies the MDEQ it has detected dangerous levels of lead in the water at the home of Flint resident Lee-Anne Walters. A mother of four, she had first contacted the EPA with concerns about dark sediment in her tap water possibly making her children sick. Testing revealed that her water had 104 parts per billion (ppb) of lead, nearly seven times greater than the EPA limit of 15 ppb.

    March 23, 2015 – Flint City Council members vote 7-1 to stop using river water and to reconnect with Detroit. However, state-appointed emergency manager, Jerry Ambrose overrules the vote calling it “incomprehensible” because costs would skyrocket and “water from Detroit is no safer than water from Flint.”

    January 21, 2016 – The EPA criticizes the state’s slow response to the crisis and expresses concerns about the construction of the new pipeline to Lake Huron. The agency issues an emergency administrative order to ensure state regulators are complying with the Safe Drinking Water Act and are being transparent in their response to the crisis. The EPA says it will begin testing the water and publishing the results on a government website. An EPA administrator who was notified in June about Flint’s high lead levels resigns effective February 1.

Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.